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Friday, 25 October 2013

"It doesn't follow automatically that policies for sustainable development will improve health and health inequalities."

An evening on Radio 3 looking at how your health is determined by your social conditions:


Michael Marmot on Self-Control

Sir Michael Marmot delivers the opening lecture of the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2013, exploring the traits that determine a healthy life span and arguing that we need to rethink the relationship between health, wealth and self-control.
Professor Marmot is one of the global pioneers of research into health inequalities - how stress, status and diet can affect our wellbeing. His ground-breaking Whitehall Studies followed the health and stress levels of British civil servants over a decade and he coined the term "status syndrome" to describe his discovery that being lower down the pecking order leads to a shorter life span.
Sir Michael Marmot's talk about whether self-control is the key to a long life was recorded earlier tonight in front of an audience at Sage Gateshead and presented by Philip Dodd. It marks the start of three weeks of Free Thinking broadcasts on BBC Radio 3.

BBC Radio 3 - Free Thinking, 2013 Festival, Michael Marmot on Self-Control


Sir Michael Marmot on why all matters are health matters

by Julia Belluz on Tuesday, August 14, 2012
Marmot... has led some of the world’s most compelling studies on the “social determinants of health.” In some 30 years of research on members of the British Civil Service, known as the Whitehall Studies, he established a link between their relative rank and risk of cardiovascular disease and death (the lower the status, the higher the risk). This, despite the fact that they were all relatively well off.
Marmot has looked at other health oddities, such as why residents of some areas of Glasgow, Scotland have a 28-year gap in life expectancy compared to those living in other neighbourhoods, and how the disease patterns of Japanese migrants in America transform to resemble those in their adopted fellow countrymen over time.
Sir Michael Marmot on why all matters are health matters - Health, Science-ish - Macleans.ca


Social Determinants of Health, 2E gives an authoritative overview of the social and economic factors which are known to be the most powerful determinants of population health in modern societies. Written by acknowledged experts in each field, it provides accessible summaries of the scientific justification for isolating different aspects of social and economic life as the primary determinants of a population's health.

Social Determinants of Health: Michael Marmot, Richard G. Wilkinson


'Fair Society Healthy Lives' (The Marmot Review)

Report abstract


In November 2008, Professor Sir Michael Marmot was asked by the then Secretary of State for Health to chair an independent review to propose the most effective evidence-based strategies for reducing health inequalities in England from 2010.
The final report, 'Fair Society Healthy Lives', was published in February 2010, and concluded that reducing health inequalities would require action on six policy objectives:

  • 1. Give every child the best start in life
  • 2. Enable all children, young people and adults to maximise their capabilities and have control over their lives
  • 3. Create fair employment and good work for all
  • 4. Ensure healthy standard of living for all
  • 5. Create and develop healthy and sustainable places and communities
  • 6. Strengthen the role and impact of ill-health prevention.

'Fair Society Healthy Lives' (The Marmot Review) - IHE
Institute of Health Equity - Michael Marmot


Sir Michael Marmot: consider health impacts when formulating policies

In an interview with Tim Smedley, Sir Michael Marmot says it doesn't follow automatically that policies for sustainable development will improve health and health inequalities

Sir Michael Marmot: consider health impacts when formulating policies | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional
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